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November 1, 2013

Is Nuvaring Birth Control Safe?

Nuvaring Birth Control SafetyNuvaring was introduced in 2001 as a safe alternative to the oral birth control contraceptives. Rising to fame due to be marketed as the perfect solution for active women, Nuvaring claimed to be 99% effective with the added benefit of not having to be consumed on a regular basis like oral contraceptives. It is estimated that over one million women have used the Nuvaring since its inception.

What is Nuvaring?

Nuvaring is a small flexible band that is about two-inches in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina and left in place for exactly three weeks.

While inserted in the vagina, the band released two specialized hormones, progestin and estrogen. These are the same hormones that are release when using oral contraception. The combination of these hormones work, to trick the body into not allowing the ovaries to produce eggs for fertilization.

At the end of the three week period, the ring is removed and the menstrual cycle begins within a few days. Nuvaring is then reinserted in exactly one week.

Side Effects of Nuvaring

There are several side effects associated with use of the Nuvaring. These include:
– Vaginal irritations and infections
– Nausea
– Weight gain
– Headaches
– Vaginal secretion
– Blood clots
– Heart attack
– Stroke

The Problem With Nuvaring

When Nuvaring was introduced to the market, it was believed that it maintained a similar risk for blood clots that oral contraception did. However, recent studies have proven this to be inaccurate. Studies reported by the FDA, the New England Journal for Medicine, and the British Medical Journal, have all revealed that women using Nuvaring are at a 90 percent great risk of having a blood clot than women who use oral birth control pills.

Lawsuit Against Nuvaring

Since many women were using Nuvaring, many had to deal with blood clots. Currently, there is a lawsuit pending in the court system that includes 1,419 women (to date), who claim to have been greatly affected by the Nuvaring side effects.

The lawsuit claims that Merck, the makers of Nuvaring, withheld information about the potential risk involved in using their product, while downplaying the apparent risks associated with Nuvaring’s use. Merck denies any wrongdoing. A trial date for Nuvaring has been set for January 27, 2014.

If you or anyone that you know experienced a blood clot, stroke, or heart attack after the use of the Nuvaring, it is not too late to become part of this lawsuit. They are still accepting plaintiffs in this case.

If you are currently using the Nuvaring or are considering starting it, you should talk to your doctor about the adverse health risks associated with its use.

What do you think of Nuvaring? Let us know in the comment box below.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 30, 2012

Semen Triggers Ovulation, New Study Suggests

Filed under: birth control options,conceiving,contraception — Tags: , — nirochabrun @ 3:06 am

The rhythm method has been a way of preventing pregnancy for some time however recent research has discovered it is even less reliable. New research conducted by Gregg Adams and his colleagues confirms that the fluid in semen is not just a vehicle for sperm to travel in; rather, it is also a substance which triggers ovulation in female mammals. Therefore there is a risk that women can become pregnant during the times when they are not ovulating simply because the liquid in semen itself is causing the female body to ovulate.

What is in the fluid that causes ovulation you may ask? It is a protein fundamental to the survival and development of sensory neurons, known as NGF or neural growth factor. Once injected, NGF in the male sperm contacts the brain by traveling through the female bloodstream. When in contact, the brain will initiate the hypothalamus and pituitary glands to release hormones that kick start ovulation.

This is not news for a group of Chinese researchers who had already noticed that there was an ovulation-inducing factor (OIF) found in semen back in 1985. They were simply ignored when they first introduced this hypothesis as it contradicted the commonly held views about the reproductive system at that time. The new study now supports their hypothesis and further research can lead to new fertility treatments for couples that are having difficulty conceiving.

Those avoiding pregnancy should make sure they are using contraceptives. This study provides evidence that NGF, or OIF in semen can activate ovulation in women even when they are not supposed to be ovulating. In other words, you can get pregnant, even when you are not ovulating. As a result, we cannot stress enough how important contraceptive use is for women who do not want to become pregnant. There are many contraception options available that are safe and effective. Speak to your doctor to find out which option is best for you.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

February 10, 2011

Clear Concept: The Contraceptive Choices That Women Are Unaware Of

Birth Control has evolved over the past decade to rectify two significant problems: abnormal bleeding and missing pills. Instead of switching to the newly improved contraception available, women are nonetheless sticking to more common methods of birth control mainly including birth control pills, condoms and withdrawal. Women are uninformed of the many non-contraceptive benefits offered by the different types of birth control available today.

birth control optionsOne example would be the advantages of the birth control pill, aside from contraception, the pill cuts the risk of ovarian and uterine cancers, relieves heavy bleeding and painful menstruation. Women are still wary to use hormonal methods of contraception due to exaggerated misinformation about the risks involved.

There are 4 different types of oral contraceptives:

  1. Low dose – contraceptives that carry low levels of ethinyl estradiol and progestin.
  2. Combined oral contraceptives – contraceptives that contain twenty to thirty micrograms of ethinyl estradiol with progestin.
  3. Progestin drospirenone (DRSP) – used in Yaz and Yasmin, drospirenone has the same pharmacological effects of that of natural progesterone thus it also has slight diuretic properties. Yaz has 24/4 formulation meaning users take active pills for twenty four days and inactive pills for four days; during the four days menstruation occurs.
  4. Extended cycle – contraceptives that allow women to opt out of menstruating, for either convenience or health reasons. With this option, women take active pills for over two cycles while omitting the hormone free interval which induces menstruation. The extended cycle has the same risks as that of the general 21/7 cycle.

The theoretical efficiency of oral contraception is not often lived up to in the real world due to regular missed pills. Studies show that up to forty percent of women often miss pills in any birth control regimen causing unwanted pregnancy and unscheduled bleeding. The transdermal patch and vaginal ring were created to minimize these problems. The patch (Evra, Ortho-Janssen) releases hormones into the skin every day for a week. The ring (Nuvaring, Merck) delivers hormones daily for one month. Both contraceptives are extremely effective and related to improved bleeding although there had been concerns about the dosage of estrogen continuously being delivered to the body. There are concerns regarding the Evra patch which dispatches more estrogen than the regular patch. There had also been warnings issued by the FDA and Health Protection Branch (HPB) about the increased risk of thrombosis associated with the patch. Hence the (vaginal ring is seen as the most competent in cycle control and consistent with the lowest rate of unscheduled bleeding. In spite of the favorable points, girls are not open to the way the ring is self administered (insertion into the vagina).

The intrauterine device continues to be overlooked by its poor image and is still unknown for its obliging efficacy and safety. Overshadowed by false ideas of increased pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility, patients and physicians are oblivious of the benefits of the intrauterine device.

  1. Copper IUD – Can be used for thirty months and are believed to be 96% to 98% effective. Failure rates are about 1% and the rates of discontinuation are around 10% – 15% mostly due to increased bleeding and pain.
  2. Mirena IUD – This IUD can be used up to five years with the highest efficacy rates of 99.8%.

The effectiveness of the use of the intrauterine device is comparable to that of surgical female sterilization. Aside from contraception, other advantages offered by the IUD include significant decrease in dysmenorrhea and bleeding. Insertion is a procedure done at a clinical office.

Evidently contraceptives are still being developed and new developments continue to be introduced to the general public. As the number of contraceptive options increase, the challenge lingers to increase awareness and reassure patients of the safety of these options.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

November 5, 2010

Birth Control Gel in testing stages

Birth Control comes in many forms including implant, injection, patch, ring, IUD, pills, and soon gel! The birth control gel is still in its early testing stages, but the results are looking optimal. The gel can be rubbed onto the arms, legs, shoulders or abdomen much like a moisturizer. Applying 3 milligrams of the gel daily will deliver the right dosage of progesterone and estrogen, much like the birth control patch, through the skin to stop the ovaries from releasing an egg every month.

The main ingredient to this gel is Nestorone, a newly developed type of synthetic progesterone very similar to the natural hormone that contains a chemically identical type of estrogen that is produced in a woman’s body.  This birth control gel will not cause users to experience common side effects such as nausea and weight gain. Women who are breastfeeding are also able to use the birth control gel because the hormones in the gel will not interfere with the milk supply.

The New York Population Council research center’s director of clinical development of reproductive health, Dr. Ruth Merkatz is the researcher behind the latest study on this birth control gel. Over a seven month period, there were 18 women in the age range from 20 to 40 who had used the birth control gel. So far, none had become  pregnant from using the gel.  Dr. Ruth Merkatz finds that the birth control gel can improve the choice of methods and options of birth control for women.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 5, 2010

Women More Likely to Use Birth Control if Partner Supports It

The “birth control” question can be confusing for partners, and birth control options are predominantly aimed towards women, putting the decision in their hands, however a new study suggests that women are twice as likely to use birth control if their partners are very much in favor of it.

The study was done in Los Angeles and Oklahoma City; lead by Marie Harvey – a professor of public health at Oregon state University.  Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the study looked at 435 couples that were between the ages of 18 and 25.  The women in the couples were not pregnant and were not trying to become pregnant.

The men and women in the study said they both participated in deciding whether or not to use birth control.  However, agreement between partners on whether they had discussed birth control was low. Harvey claims that this contradiction is typical in male and female relationships.  To a woman, a conversation about birth control might include weighing in all birth control options and having a long detailed conversation.  To a man, it could be as easy as asking a woman if she is on birth control.

Both partners were interviewed on contraception use and pregnancy motivation. It was found that even among women not trying to get pregnant, less than 60% said avoiding pregnancy was extremely important.  Regardless of what the women had said about avoiding pregnancy, a large number of surveyed women were engaging in unprotected sex.  This reflects mainly on the education that health care providers are giving to young women.  “Providers need to probe more to understand women’s’ motivations and help them clarify their desires about whether or not to use contraception” Harvey said.

“We are trying to better understand the influence of partners…Public health research in the past has largely focused on the woman alone, but we know that a woman’s partner can be very influential.  Yet, research rarely addresses the influence of sexual partners on protective behaviors.”

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

August 17, 2010

FDA Approves of New Emergency Contraceptive Pill

The U.S Food and Drug Administration have approved of ella, a new one-dose emergency contraceptive that works longer than the current leading drug on the market.  In June this year, the FDA unanimously voted that the use of ella provided convincing data and sufficient information on its safety.  ella was approved last year in Europe under the name ellaOne and is currently used in 22 countries.

The FDA approved ella as a prescription-only birth control option.  This ruling allows for U.S sales of the drug.  Ella from HRA Pharma is to be marketed as an emergency contraceptive that can be taken within 5 days of unprotected sex or contraceptive failure.  The current emergency contraceptive drug ‘Plan B’ is approved for use up to 3 days after unprotected intercourse.

In a trial between Plan B and ella, women randomly received one of the two pills within three to five days of having unprotected sex.   Women who took ella had a 1.8 percent chance of becoming pregnant.  Women who took plan B had a 2.6 percent chance.

Consequently, Plan B is currently available without a prescription for those 17 and older where as ella will require a doctor’s prescription.  HRA Pharma did not request an over-the-counter position for ella.

There is some concern about women becoming confused by the use of ella. Although ella prevents ovulation for as long as 5 days after sex, some women may believe that once taking ella, it can protect them against pregnancy from any additional acts of unprotected sex for 5 days.  This is not true as sperm from additional sex can outlive the initial sperm past the 5 day window.  In addition, the FDA is concerned about the obesity rates in the US and ella’s effect on overweight and obese women.   Ella seems to be less effective in obese women.

Ella works differently than Plan B.  Though both emergency contraceptives contain hormones that prevent ovulation, ella also contains ulipristal, a non-hormonal drug that blocks the effects of hormones necessary for conception.  Ella belongs to the same class as a drug called mifepristone – a drug that is used as a part of a treatment that induces abortion. This calls for criticism from pro-life groups who believe that ella is closer to an abortion pill than an emergency contraceptive pill.   However, ella is used at lower doses that prevent conception and should not cause abortion.  It is still unknown whether or not ella will affect an existing pregnancy, or if ella might increase the rate of spontaneous miscarriage in the few women who become pregnant despite using ella.

The FDA reviewers reported no life-threatening medical side effects with ella. The most common side effects were mild and included headache, nausea, and abdominal pain.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

August 3, 2010

Hormonal Contraceptives are Less Effective in Overweight/Obese Women

A systematic review of results reported online has concluded that hormonal contraceptives (such as skin patches, vaginal rings, implants, pills, and injections) may not be as effective in overweight and obese women.

With obesity rates increasing worldwide every year, it is important that these findings be shared with the public.

The results from seven studies on 39,531 women on the success of hormonal contraceptives were examined and the results were varied among the different methods of birth control.  Some methods such as the birth control pill and the patch were less effective at preventing pregnancy in the obese and overweight women who used a hormonal contraceptive.

Body mass index, or BMI, played a large role in the effectiveness of the birth control pill.  Women with a BMI higher than 25 (classified as overweight), were more likely to get pregnant while using the pill than women with a BMI under 25.

Body weight, on the other hand, was the factor among women using the skin patch, vaginal ring, implant, or injection.  The body weight due to fat on the body determined the pregnancy risk among women using contraception.  Overweight and obese women using the skin patch, progestin implant, and vaginal ring were more likely to get pregnant than women of normal weight using these forms of contraception.  Curiously enough, the effectiveness of the hormonal injection was not affected by BMI or body weight.  One possible reason for the decreased effectiveness of the skin patch is simply that there is a higher density of fat cells in areas where the patch is to be placed.  The fat cells in the way of the blood stream can absorb and store the hormones preventing them from reaching the blood stream.

The exact reason why overweight and obese women are at a greater risk of pregnancy while using hormonal contraceptives is unknown.  Although several theories imply that it has something to do with specific biological factors.

Liver Enzymes – overweight women can experience an increased regulation of liver metabolism.  These higher levels of enzymes can help break down the hormones in oral contraceptives.  Heavier women have a greater circulating blood volume and body mass therefore there is more tissue for blood to circulate though. The chance that enzymes will break down the hormones in contraception is faster therefore the levels of circulating hormones can be decreased.

Hormone Storage – Hormones like estrogen and progestin that are found in birth control are stored in body fat.  The more fat cells on a woman, the greater her chances of the hormones becoming stored in her fat rather than flowing into her bloodstream.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

March 25, 2010

Who Should Use IUDs?

IUDs (Intra-Uterine Devices) are becoming increasingly popular in North America. The IUD is a low-maintenance, effective form of birth control. Once a device is in place, it can work for 5-12 years (depending on the device) and you can have it taken out sooner if you need to have a child or change methods. IUDs protect you from pregnancy each time you are sexually active and you don’t feel it or notice it’s there.
The IUD is the best option for women who have a low risk of acquiring STIs (sexually transmitted infections), need to avoid estrogen-based products and want a reversible type of birth control. Married women or women in a long-term relationship over the age of 20 are the best candidates. Although young adults can use IUDs effectively, they are more likely than adults to have multiple partners and are therefore at an increased risk of contracting an STI. The IUD isn’t a good first choice for a newly sexually active teen because she cannot predict her partners future sexual behavior. In addition, problems including expulsion, removal for bleeding and pain, and pregnancies are more common in teens than older women using the IUD. Talk to your doctor about your birth control options to find out what is best for you.


Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

January 13, 2010

Is It Best For You To Get Rid Of Your Period?

Menstrual cycles are annoying and painful for most women. They cause mood swings, cramps, headaches, and are uncomfortable. Taking a birth control pill on a daily basis has halted woman’s menstrual cycles in many cases. For women to hear that with a simple pill they can stop their period is glorious! But is this pill safe? Is it as effective as we have been told? There are various pros and cons to be considered.

Pros
Women don’t need a period – The only reason known for a menstrual cycle, is for a woman to get pregnant. A period occurs to rid the body of the uterine lining which has been built up monthly to prepare the egg to be fertilized. When you are on a hormonal birth control pill the lining no longer builds up, thus there is nothing to expel and no reason for a period. A traditional 28 day pack of birth control pills have 7 placebo (sugar, no-hormone) pills. The lack of hormones is what causes the flow.

It is convenient – With monthly menstrual cycles many women undergo severe pain. The symptoms include headaches, cramps, mood swings, and various other painful and undesired feelings. When taking birth control pills and not having a period, there are no symptoms and no pain!

Skipping periods is another reproductive choice for women; the more choices we have, the better.

If you decide to use/continue using birth control pills as a way to stop your period, check with your insurance if they are covered in your plan. You will need a doctor’s written approval to prescribe you with BCP’s for excessive pain before your insurance will cover the pills.

Cons

It’s not philosophically right – Periods are not diseases. The pill is not an antibiotic. Doctors have prescribed continuous-hormone birth control pills for women who experience extreme pains, mood swings, and discomforts. Getting rid of one’s period would be just a matter of convenience. By expelling menstrual cycles it gives the image that women’s periods are something to be ashamed of.

Lybrel doesn’t work – A new release, the no-bleeding pill, Lybrel, might not work for all women. After a year of using Lybrel, a study showed that 40 percent of women on Lybrel still had spotting, and 20 percent bled enough to need tampons or pads.

May be unsafe – Although most professionals say BCP’s are safe for stopping your period, we have yet to know the long term effects of taking hormones nonstop might be.

How will you tell you are pregnant – Skipped periods are the most common way women discover they are pregnant. If you are not expecting your period, how will you know you are pregnant?

We do not know enough about using BCP’s to stop periods to consider it completely safe.

 



Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit https://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.