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November 5, 2010

Birth Control Gel in testing stages

Birth Control comes in many forms including implant, injection, patch, ring, IUD, pills, and soon gel! The birth control gel is still in its early testing stages, but the results are looking optimal. The gel can be rubbed onto the arms, legs, shoulders or abdomen much like a moisturizer. Applying 3 milligrams of the gel daily will deliver the right dosage of progesterone and estrogen, much like the birth control patch, through the skin to stop the ovaries from releasing an egg every month.

The main ingredient to this gel is Nestorone, a newly developed type of synthetic progesterone very similar to the natural hormone that contains a chemically identical type of estrogen that is produced in a woman’s body.  This birth control gel will not cause users to experience common side effects such as nausea and weight gain. Women who are breastfeeding are also able to use the birth control gel because the hormones in the gel will not interfere with the milk supply.

The New York Population Council research center’s director of clinical development of reproductive health, Dr. Ruth Merkatz is the researcher behind the latest study on this birth control gel. Over a seven month period, there were 18 women in the age range from 20 to 40 who had used the birth control gel. So far, none had become  pregnant from using the gel.  Dr. Ruth Merkatz finds that the birth control gel can improve the choice of methods and options of birth control for women.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 5, 2010

Women More Likely to Use Birth Control if Partner Supports It

The “birth control” question can be confusing for partners, and birth control options are predominantly aimed towards women, putting the decision in their hands, however a new study suggests that women are twice as likely to use birth control if their partners are very much in favor of it.

The study was done in Los Angeles and Oklahoma City; lead by Marie Harvey – a professor of public health at Oregon state University.  Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the study looked at 435 couples that were between the ages of 18 and 25.  The women in the couples were not pregnant and were not trying to become pregnant.

The men and women in the study said they both participated in deciding whether or not to use birth control.  However, agreement between partners on whether they had discussed birth control was low. Harvey claims that this contradiction is typical in male and female relationships.  To a woman, a conversation about birth control might include weighing in all birth control options and having a long detailed conversation.  To a man, it could be as easy as asking a woman if she is on birth control.

Both partners were interviewed on contraception use and pregnancy motivation. It was found that even among women not trying to get pregnant, less than 60% said avoiding pregnancy was extremely important.  Regardless of what the women had said about avoiding pregnancy, a large number of surveyed women were engaging in unprotected sex.  This reflects mainly on the education that health care providers are giving to young women.  “Providers need to probe more to understand women’s’ motivations and help them clarify their desires about whether or not to use contraception” Harvey said.

“We are trying to better understand the influence of partners…Public health research in the past has largely focused on the woman alone, but we know that a woman’s partner can be very influential.  Yet, research rarely addresses the influence of sexual partners on protective behaviors.”

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

August 23, 2010

Women using Birth Control Pills have Increased Brain Function

A recent study from Salzburg University in Austria has concluded that contraceptive pills can increase the areas of the brain associated with memory and social skills.

The research showed that contraceptives enhance the brain’s conversation area which leads to improved social skills. Gray matter area essential for memory also grows in size by about 3% with oral contraceptive use.

Scientists took images of the brains of 14 men and 28 women (some of which were using the pill).  The women who were not using birth control pills were scanned several times over a one month period to tract their natural hormonal fluctuations.  Areas of the brain in women taking the pill were larger than the brains of the women who were not.  The growth in women only occurred in regions of the brain that were naturally larger than men to begin with – such as the areas involved in conversation.  The pill had little effect on the areas of women’s brains that are more dominant in men, such as special skills and map reading.

The results were the same regardless of the type of birth control used or the length of time it had been prescribed for.

Studies have previously been conducted on the differences in brain structure between men and women, however this is the first time a study has looked at the impact of hormonal contraceptives on the brain.

It was concluded that the sex hormones in the pill have a significant effect on the brain.  An increase in the volume of a brain area can actually improve the functions related to that area.  The changes are more likely to affect the skills (such as memory and verbal skills) that are already more developed in women compared to men.

It is possible that the estrogen and progesterone in the pill can help strengthen the links between nerve cells in the brain.  The brains size overall did not increase with the use of hormonal contraceptives, and it is not known whether the increased areas will return back to their original size if a woman stops using the pill.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

June 2, 2010

Ultrasound is a Male Contraceptive

Researchers in the University of North Carolina are pushing for further research into the new idea that an ultrasound can be used as a reversible contraceptive for men. The idea is that a blast of ultrasound to the testes may be able to stop sperm production for approximately six months. Once the sperm production has been stopped, all the sperm in the sperm reserves must be used up before this contraceptive method is effective.

This would offer another method of birth control for couples. It is thought that these sperm impeding ultrasounds would be affordable to most people. The plan in the long-term for the University team is to use an ultrasound from instruments found in sports medicine or physical therapy clinics. One of the best things about this contraceptive method is that it is thought that the sperm production will continue as normal after the approximate six months of infertility is up.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation sponsored this research with a $100,000 grant (one of seventy-eight grants by this foundation). This financial help will support the pursuing of clinical trials to prove this method. One warning issued about this contraceptive is that although it will prevent pregnancy (if it is proven), it will not protect against the transmissions of STI’s.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

May 28, 2010

5 STI Risk Factors

At least one in every four Americans will contract and STI at some point in their life.   STI’s are a serious health problem to adults and if they go untreated, they can cause permanent  damage.  Certain factors in your life will determine your risk of contracting an STI, so here are the top 5 STI risk factors –

1. Unprotected Sex – This one is a given, but it is very important.  You’re more likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection if you do not use barrier methods of birth control like condoms.

2. Being Young – People between 18 and 29 are more likely to be infected with an STI than an older person.  Women and men in their 20’s have the highest rates of STI’s out of any age group.  This could be because young women are more susceptible to them.  Their cervix’s aren’t fully developed and they are more likely to experience tearing during intercourse.  Young people in general are less likley to practice safe sex by using condoms, and are more likely to have multiple partners.

3.Alcohol and drug use
–  People who use alcohol and drugs on regular basis may have lowered inhibitions and may be less “picky” about who they choose for a partner.  Those under the influence of alcohol and drugs may be more stubborn about condom use.

4. Having multiple partners – The more partners you have the more likely you are to be exposed to STI’s. Usually people with multiple partners choose partners who have also had multiple partners. This increases the risk of your partner having contracted an STI from a different partner.  Your risk increases even higher if you hire a sexual professional because the truth is they aren’t being paid to enforce safe sex with partners.

5. Relying only on Birth Control Pills – for most sexually active people their main concern is pregnancy.  Lots of couples choose birth control pills as their only contraceptive method.  This is 99% effective against pregnancy, but this does not protect against STI’s.  Once a couple is established in using the pill as their only form of protection, they will become reluctant to use condoms.  This can be because they have gotten used to a sexual routine without condoms, or perhaps because they just don’t like using them.  The safest option is to use birth control pills AND condoms.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

February 1, 2010

When You Should Switch Your Birth Control Pill

The pill is a common contraception option among women. It is an easy way to prevent pregnancy if taken properly and can be up to 99% effective. However some specific types of birth control pills may not be the best option for you. Your body may react differently to the medicine, and many women choose to switch to a different pill if the side effects are unbearable.

Side effects – There are usually side effects with most birth control pills. If you experience minor side effects its not a sign to switch pills. Side effects are common in most people, and the side effects are listed in the booklet that comes with a pack of pills. Common side effects can include headaches, nausea, vomiting, decreased libido, and changes in blood pressure. If you notice any unusual symptoms mention them to your doctor on your next visit – they may suggest switching pills.

Menstruation Changes – If there has been any change in your regular menstrual cycle after going on the pill, consider the changes. While on the pill your periods should be lighter and shorter, not heavier and longer. If you experience increased menstrual bleeding after going on the pill, tell your doctor and see if they recommend the use of a different pill. If you feel increased discomfort during your period (painful cramps or other symptoms starting a week before your period) inform your doctor. The pill should not make period symptoms worse. If birth control improves the comfort of your menstrual period, it is not necessary to switch pills.

Weight Gain – Before you assume that the pill is causing you to gain wait, think about any lifestyle changes that you’ve made after going on the pill. People often blame weight gain on birth control, but there is very little evidence that the pill causes weight gain. Pills that are higher in estrogen levels can lead to an increased appetite and water retention, making you bloated. Tell your doctor if you feel that your pill caused you to gain weight. They may switch you to a pill with lower hormone levels such as Yasmin or Alesse.

Mood Swings – You may experience mood swings that started with taking the pill. The hormone levels in birth control pills cause mood swings in most women. If you notice that you are starting to feel depressed or moody for no apparent reason, it could be because of the birth control pill that you are on. You may want to talk to your doctor about your options, but in most cases switching pills will not solve this problem.

Cost- The birth control you are on may be too expensive for your lifestyle. If you are having trouble paying for your birth control every month, try switching to a generic brand. These pills are more affordable than the brand name pills you pay for.

Usually, different types of birth control pills can improve your symptoms and side effects. However, if you feel that birth control pills aren’t right for you, there are many other contraceptive options available such as patches, rings, and IUDs.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit https://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

July 23, 2009

North American Women are Afraid of IUD’s

The Intrauterine Device (IUD) is the world most popular form of reversible birth control. There are more than 160 million women in the world who use this device – more than two thirds of which live in China.

The IUD is a reversible option to birth control, it does not require daily consumption (birth control pills), it is a safe effective alternative to birth control pills (based on its doses of hormones), and a single device inserted into the uterine can stay active for up to 10 years. The simplicity and the benefits of this device are overwhelming!

So why it is that less than 4% of all North American women use this birth control method?

Perhaps it was the Dalkon Shield scare in the 1970’s that has forever tainted the reputation of IUDs. “Dalkon Shield” was an IUD that was ultimately pulled out of the Canadian market due to it’s negative effects on consumers. There were many cases of infections, infertility, miscarriages, and death amongst its users.
Since then safe alternative IUD models have been develop and have prospered in popularity throughout the world. In China, more than 90 million women are rushing to get their hands on IUD contraceptives.

The United Nations department of economic and social affairs reported that only 2.9% of Canadian women and 1.8% of American women use IUD’s for contraception. Compared to the 19.6% in Asia, and 13.9% in the Caribbean, North American use of the IUD is surprisingly scarce.

An IUD is inserted and removed by a doctor quickly and easily, and can last up to 10 years depending on the model and desire for use. IUD’s prevent implantation of an egg by changing the lining of the uterus so that an egg cannot properly attach. IUD’s have other benefits as the also act as treatment to reduce acne and facial hair. It is expected that the popularity of the device will increase in North America as women grow more comfortable with the method and its benefits. The Dalkon Shield scare is now in the past.

Some popular brands of IUD are Mirena and ParaGard



Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

May 13, 2009

New Male Contraceptive as Reliable as Condoms

Though condoms are said to be roughly 98 percent effective if used properly and consistently, many men know that things can go wrong, and the condom may fail. Be this by breaking or the condom slipping off, the effectiveness in the “real world” isn’t as high as many manufacturers would have you believe. Some men try to use the “withdrawal” tactic, where the man attempt to pull out before ejaculating. This is one of those things that you should NOT do. Additionally, there is the option for the man to have a vasectomy, but many men can’t bring themselves to “take the plunge” so to speak.

However, now there may be another option for men that would allow them to take on part of the responsibilities of birth control. Chinese researches tested a male contraceptive shot, which is injected monthly into the buttocks. The contraceptive, which is a form of testosterone, temporarily blocks sperm production. The study found that the contraceptive was 99 percent effective, and only had a failure rate of only 1.1 per 100 men.

Additionally, the contraceptive shot is convenient. The shot is administered once a month, but then saves the awkward, last minute fumbling in the dark trying to find and put on a condom. Males and females alike can definitely appreciate this.

The best thing about the shot may be the fact that it is only a temporary birth control and after 6 months of stopping injections, all but two of the 1045 men tested

had their reproductive function return to normal range.

The most difficult obstacle to pass for men is trying to get their significant other to trust them to have their shot. Even though many men are very willing to take this contraceptive shot, many women are doubtful that these men will be motivated enough to go and receive a shot every month. Either way, you may need to wait some time for this new form of birth control to hit the market, due to the need for long-term testing. When this product finally does emerge onto the open market it will be interesting to see what the response is.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

April 21, 2007

Emergency Contraception…..

Emergency Contraception Does Not Reduce Unintended Pregnancy Rate

By Taunya English, Associate Editor, April 17, 2007
Health Behavior News Service

The “morning after pill” may be a good option for individual women in crisis, but advance access to emergency contraception is no antidote for the national problem of unintended pregnancy.

Contrary to the fears of critics, the presence of Plan B does not provoke riskier sexual behavior.

According to a new review of studies, women who received an advance supply of birth control pills for emergency contraception had an equal chance of becoming pregnant as women who did not have early access to the pills.

The review draws conclusions from eight studies of more than 6,000 women in the United States, India and China.

Plan B is a well-known brand of emergency contraception pills, but many different types of birth control medication taken at higher doses can prevent pregnancy after sex. Treatment must begin within five days after unprotected sex – and sooner is better when it comes to EC.

“We had expected that easier access to emergency contraception could help women use the pills more quickly when they needed them, and that in turn – since EC is a time-relevant medication – this could help women avoid unintended pregnancy,” said lead reviewer Chelsea Polis.

“Our review is really about the effectiveness of advance provision as a strategy to reduce unintended pregnancy at a population level,” Polis said. “The review is not about the effectiveness of EC; that is a separate matter.”

The review appears in the current issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates research in all aspects of health care. Systematic reviews draw evidence-based conclusions about medical practice after considering both the content and quality of existing trials on a topic.M

In 2001, about half of pregnancies in the United States were unintended, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now, the United States is working to lower the unintended pregnancy rate to 30 percent by 2010.

Princeton University demographer James Trussell says easier access to emergency contraception will not slow the rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States.

“For individual women, it is definitely a last chance to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. But it is not going to have a major population impact because people will never use it enough,” he said.

The review found that emergency contraception use was higher among women given an advance supply of the birth control pills, but that increase in use did not translate to a drop in the pregnancy rate.

“Even though advance provision increased use, we don’t know if women were using EC at the times when they were at risk for pregnancy, when it was really needed,” Polis explains.

“If women aren’t going to use Plan B when they are given it for free in a clinical trial and are counseled beforehand about using it every single time they have unprotected sex, then having to go to CVS and having to pay $45 each time – it isn’t going to happen,” Trussell said.

Nonetheless, Polis said her review is not an argument against easier access to emergency contraception.

“Women deserve the chance to protect themselves from unintended pregnancy and EC is a safe, effective way to do that. Emergencies like rape, contraceptive failure and unprotected sex occur, and easier access to EC eliminates a medically unwarranted barrier to taking emergency contraception within the recommended timeframe,” she said. “So steps like making EC available over the counter are still incredibly important.”

When advanced access to emergency contraception was first proposed, critics worried that a medicine cabinet stocked with pills to prevent pregnancy would lead some women to be more promiscuous, have riskier sex or not use condoms.

The Cochrane review counters those concerns.

“We found there was absolutely no difference in sexually transmitted infection rates between the two groups. There’s absolutely no difference in terms of unprotected sex, condom use or changes in use of other contraceptive methods,” Polis said. “So it appears that advance provision of EC has no harmful effects in terms of risky sexual behaviors.”

Polis CB, et al. Advance provision of emergency contraception for pregnancy
prevention. (Review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007, Issue 2.

BirthControlBuzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, birth control types (prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase birth control on-line.

For more information on types of birth control call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.