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November 5, 2010

Birth Control Gel in testing stages

Birth Control comes in many forms including implant, injection, patch, ring, IUD, pills, and soon gel! The birth control gel is still in its early testing stages, but the results are looking optimal. The gel can be rubbed onto the arms, legs, shoulders or abdomen much like a moisturizer. Applying 3 milligrams of the gel daily will deliver the right dosage of progesterone and estrogen, much like the birth control patch, through the skin to stop the ovaries from releasing an egg every month.

The main ingredient to this gel is Nestorone, a newly developed type of synthetic progesterone very similar to the natural hormone that contains a chemically identical type of estrogen that is produced in a woman’s body.  This birth control gel will not cause users to experience common side effects such as nausea and weight gain. Women who are breastfeeding are also able to use the birth control gel because the hormones in the gel will not interfere with the milk supply.

The New York Population Council research center’s director of clinical development of reproductive health, Dr. Ruth Merkatz is the researcher behind the latest study on this birth control gel. Over a seven month period, there were 18 women in the age range from 20 to 40 who had used the birth control gel. So far, none had become  pregnant from using the gel.  Dr. Ruth Merkatz finds that the birth control gel can improve the choice of methods and options of birth control for women.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

November 1, 2010

Contraceptive Alternatives-Hormonal Contraceptives–Implants

Hormonal contraceptives are defined as the birth control methods that affect the endocrine system. This includes the pill, patch, vaginal ring, injection, implants, and plan B.  Here we will be focusing on implants.

Implants have been approved by the FDA since 1990. The implant method consists of 6 silicone rubber rods which are put into the women’s upper arm. The implant works by releasing levonorgestrel each day. This method provides protection for 5 years. This method slowly loses its efficiency over time. When it first starts it is 99.8 percent effective and by the fifth year it is 98.9 percent effective. This method of contraceptive is beneficial to use because of the length of time it is effective. Once the device is removed you are immediately returned to a state of fertility. There is also no effect on breast milk production.

There are disadvantages of using this device as a contraceptive and it is always important to know all about the birth control before committing to one. Unfortunately to insert this device the patient must undergo minor surgery, and it is difficult to remove. You may experience menstrual irregularities from using this method of contraceptive. You may also suffer from headaches, mood changes, galactorrhea (excessive milk flow during lactation) and acne. If you experience any of these complications you should talk to your doctor: thrombophlebitis, genital bleeding, liver disease, liver tumors, suspected breast cancer, and hypertension. A few studies have shown that implants tend to have complications.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 25, 2010

Contraceptive Alternatives–Mechanical Barriers

Filed under: contraceptives,Uncategorized — Candace @ 10:29 am

Male and female condoms, as well as the diaphragm, cervical cap and spermicide are examples of mechanical barriers. Having already covered male and female condoms we can now look at the diaphragm, cervical cap, and spermicide.

The diaphragm is a latex cup with a spring-like instrument used to hold it in place in the vaginal canal. Diaphragms are made in all different sizes thus to be sized you must have a pelvic exam and measure the diagonal length of the vaginal canal. The diaphragm is inserted before intercourse and spermicidal is put on the inside of the dome which covers the cervix. The diaphragm works by preventing semen from entering in the cervix. The diaphragm works for 6 hours after being placed in the vaginal canal. If you do not remove the device in these 6 hours a fresh application of spermicide can be applied. After intercourse the diaphragm cannot be removed until at least 6 hours have passed. Depending on the age of the person using the diaphragm and the use of spermicide the effectiveness can range. On average the diaphragm is 80 percent effective. The diaphragm is beneficial because no hormones are used or altered and the woman has control of conception. The disadvantages of this device include the increased risks of having a urinary tract infection, the risk of toxic shock syndrome, and the high failure rate. The diaphragm can produce an odor if it is not properly cleaned.

The cervical cap is a cup shaped latex device that fits over the bottom of the cervix. A seal is made with a small groove in the device. The cap has to be three-quarters full of spermicide before being inserted into the vaginal canal. The cervical cap prevents sperm from entering the cervix and also is a chemical agent using spermicide. The cervical cap is normally 80 percent effective in nulliparous women and 60 percent effective in parous women. The advantage of using the cervical cap is that it provides continuous protection for its full extent of use, regardless of the number of intercourse acts. The cervical cap doesn’t use ongoing hormones. Unfortunately cervical erosion can result in spotting and you may be at an increased risk of Toxic Shock Syndrome when you leave the cervical cap in for lengthy periods of time. You may only use the cervical cap if you have a history of normal results on Pap tests.

Spermicide contains an agent which obliterates the cell membrane of the sperm. Spermicide comes in the form of jellies, foams, films, creams, suppositories and foaming tablets. Spermicide must be inserted into the vagina before intercourse. Using spermicide also lessens the chance of conditions caused by both viral and bacterial organisms that can lead to STI’s. The efficiency of protecting against HIV is limited. Spermicide is 94 percent effective if used perfectly, but typically has a 74 percent rate of effectiveness in the first year of use. The benefits of using spermicide are that the lubrication from spermicide can increase the pleasure for both partners, it is available without a prescription, and spermicide does not affect future fertility. Spermicide does not protect against HIV/AIDS. Using spermicide can be messy and cause a bad taste during oral sex. If spermicide is used frequently they can irritate the vagina and make it easier to contract STI’s. Spermicide can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 22, 2010

Contraceptive Alternatives – Male and Female Condoms

Filed under: contraceptives — Candace @ 10:28 am

Male condoms are very commonly used. A condom is a thin sheath which envelopes the glans and shaft of the penis. The condom provides the best protection against STI’s and prevents semen from entering the vagina. The success rate of condoms if used perfectly each time a couple has intercourse in the first year of use is 97 percent. On average, condoms are only 76 percent effective in the first year of use. Common errors with using condoms is not using condoms with every act of intercourse, not using proper lubricants with latex condoms, and inaccurate position of the condom on the penis. The advantages of using condoms are that they are widely available and inexpensive. Condoms also are able to protect against STI’s while preventing pregnancy! Unfortunately condoms can decrease the enjoyment of sex.  Condoms also break and can slip or slide. Another disadvantage is that oil-based lubricants can damage the condom.

Female condoms are the opposite of male condoms. The Reality female condom, for example, is a sheath used only one time, which contains two flexible rings, 7.8 cm in diameter and 17 cm long. The ring at the closed end of the condom is placed in the vaginal canal. The other ring stays outside the canal after insertion. The female condom prevents semen from entering the vagina. The male and female condom should not both be used collectively as they can hold to each other and cause slipping or other failure with both condoms. The use of  female condoms is not very common; less than one percent of women in the United States use this method of contraception. This method is 75 percent efficient in preventing pregnancies. The female condom, unlike the male condom, does not deteriorate with the use of oil-based lubricants. The condom can be inserted up to 8 hours before intercourse. The inside of the sheath is coated in a silicone lubricant. A disadvantage of using female condoms is that the lube doesn’t contain spermicide. Female condoms are difficult to place in the vagina and the inner ring can be uncomfortable. The female condom may cause a urinary tract infection if left in the vaginal canal for long periods of time.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

March 12, 2010

The First Forms of Contraception

The first contraceptive methods mark much further back in history than anyone would expect; the first known forms of birth control date all the way back to 1850 B.C.E., when Egyptian women took to inserting objects and concoctions into their vagina to effectively block or kill sperm. Called pessaries, the Egyptians frequently used different concoctions made from honey and even crocodile feces as what they perceived to be effective forms of birth control.

Honey as a Contraceptive?
Although few of us would place our faith in honey as a contraceptive, the recipe for the honey concoction that the early Egyptians used was quite effective. The recipe involves the primary ingredients of acacia berries, colocynth and honey. When acacia berries are compounded, they form lactic anhydride, which is extremely similar to lactic acid, a component often used in modern contraceptive jellies. It is unclear what the colocynth ingredient may have been; however, many historians will categorize it as a plant called Citrullus colocynthis Schrad, which produces a type of bitter apple with properties that may induce abortion. The use of Citrullus colocynthis Schrad as an abortifacient is still utilized today among many Arabic women.

Are Crocodile Feces Actually Effective?
Not many of us would truly ever wish to use crocodile feces as a pessary form of contraception, and it’s a good thing too, because under modern medical scrutinization, the recipe of the crocodile feces concoction does not appear to be effective in any way. In fact, according to modern medical science, the insertion of crocodile feces into the vagina is likely to increase chances of becoming pregnant. Crocodile dung is quite alkaline, and because the optimal pH level conditions to encourage pregnancy are more alkaline than the natural pH levels of the vagina, the feces would not act as an effective contraceptive. The Egyptians would have used crocodile dung likely because of the similarities between the crocodile and depictions of the Egyptian god Seth, who was associated with miscarriage and abortion in their religious beliefs.

The Egyptians were the first in what is now a multi-million dollar industry today, which, thankfully has modernized to provide several different methods of birth control from condoms to oral contraceptives, none of which include any form of animal feces.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit https://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.