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August 23, 2010

Healing Herpes With Honey

Filed under: herpes — Tags: , , , , , , — Candace @ 2:14 pm

Herpes welts are unsightly and normally agonizing but there are available medications (Acyclovir) used to treat herpes. It was recently discovered that honey is a better treatment with less side effects and a faster healing time.

Honey is one of the best natural wound fighters, and does everything from taking the itch out of a stinging nettle rash, to healing a sore throat, to reducing allergy symptoms! Honey is also used to disinfect wounds and speeds up the healing process.

A recently published study showed that 16 patients who had reoccurring herpes used Acyclovir cream for one patch of sores, and honey for another affected area. They applied Acyclovir (and left it on) 6 times daily, and honey four times daily. The honey was applied by gauze soaked in honey, pressed onto the sores for 15 minutes. With honey, herpes sores on the lips (cold sores) had a 43 percent better healing time than acyclovir. Genital herpes sores had a 59 percent better healing time than acyclovir. When using acyclovir there were reported side effects of itching sensation where applied, but when using honey there were no reported side effects.

If you experience reoccurring herpes you can prevent them rather than treat them as they come. If you remove sugar and reduce carbs from your diet you can reduce, or even stop herpes outbreaks. The stimulant of herpes is called L-arginine. Foods that reproduce when you plant them carry high levels of L-arginine: nuts, beans, grains, and seeds. Reducing these foods in your diet (not eliminating them, as a slight amount is beneficial) can prevent recurrent herpes.

Do not use processed honey (the kind you find in grocery stores) on herpes. This can increase your infection! To treat herpes you can use Maunka honey, or raw honey. As well it has been found beneficial to use Vitamin C, Aloe Vera, and Garlic to treat herpes sores.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

February 2, 2009

What is an STI?

An STI is an acronym for Sexually Transmitted Infections. They are infections transmitted through having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has an infection. It can also be passed through skin-to-skin contact, childbirth, breastfeeding, sex toys, or through IV drug needles from an infected person. Both viruses and bacteria can develop an STI. Viruses that develop STI include HBV (Hepatitis B), HCV (Hepatitis C), herpes, genital warts, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and HPV (Human Popilloma Virus). Bacteria that develop STI include Chlamydia, gonorrhea, bacterial vaginosis, and syphilis.

What is the difference between an STI and an STD?

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD), also known as venereal diseases (VD), are infectious diseases passed from one person to another through sex. If left untreated, it can cause permanent damage, for example, infertility and death.

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) may infect others or a person may be infected without experiencing symptoms of the disease.

What are the symptoms of STI?

  • Itching around the vagina for women
  • Unusual discharge from the vagina for women
  • Discharge from the penis for men
  • Pain during or following sex
  • Pain or burning when urinating
  • Pain in the pelvic area
  • Sore throats in people who have oral sex
  • Pain in or around the anus for people who have anal sex
  • Chancre sores (painless red sores) on the genital area, anus, tongue and/or throat
  • A scaly rash on the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet
  • Dark urine, loose, light-colored stools, and yellow eyes and skin
  • Small blisters that turn into scabs on the genital area
  • Swollen glands, fever and body aches
  • Unusual infections, unexplained fatigue, night sweats and weight loss
  • Soft, flesh-colored warts around the genital area
  • Flu-like symptoms (eg. HBV, HCV, HIV)

How can I prevent myself from getting an STI?

To lower the risk of getting an STI is to have sex with someone who is not having sex with anyone else and who does not have an STI. Always use condoms when having sex, including oral and anal sex. Limit the number of sex partners you have and ask him/her if he/she has had or been tested for an STI. Also let him/her know if you have had or tested for one too. Do not have sex if either you or your partner is being treated for an STI.

Although STIs do not always have symptoms, look for signs of STI in your sex partner. The best way to kill the germs before they infect you, wash your genitals with soap and water and urinate soon after you have sex.

Do not use spermicide to prevent STIs. Recent study results indicate that the nonoxynol-9 in spermicides irritates a womans vagina and cervix increasing the risk for an STI infection. Make sure you check other products for ingredients with nonoxynol-9 before using it.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control (prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line.

For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.
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Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.