Just Released! New Lower Prices!

July 15, 2015

How Understanding The Root Cause Of Female Sexual Dysfunction Lead To A Happier Sex Life

Filed under: sex ed,sex education,sex talk — Tags: , , — nirochabrun @ 9:00 am

c

Sexual dysfunction is a topic that people don’t usually talk about, but is a common occurrence.  This is true not just among men but also women as well. Many women experience problems with their sexual function at certain stages of their life. It may happen once in a while, or it may be ongoing and can last a long time.

Female sexual dysfunction can be characterized into different types, such as the following:

Low sexual desire – characterized by a lack of sex drive or diminished libido
Low Sexual arousal –  intact desire for sex, but a difficulty in becoming aroused or maintaining arousal during sexual activity.
Sexual pain disorder –  the experience of pain during vaginal contact or sexual stimulation
Orgasmic disorder –  persistent difficulty in achieving orgasm even after sufficient sexual arousal and stimulation.

A person’s sexual response is not just physical, but is the interplay between physiology, experiences, emotions, beliefs, relationships and lifestyles. Any problem with either of these components may induce one of the four problems mentioned above.

Causes of female sexual dysfunction

The causes of female sexual dysfunction may be categorized into two types: physical and psychological causes. Physical causes include illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and hormonal imbalance. Aside from physical conditions, certain medications may also affect a person’s sexual drive. Psychological causes, on the other hand, can range from anxiety and stress to insecurity and concern about appearance and sexual performance. Problems in one’s marriage or relationship, strong feelings of guilt, depression and apprehension due to past sexual trauma are just a few psychological causes.

Diagnosing female sexual dysfunction

Female sexual dysfunction can be diagnosed through a number of ways, but most of the time, a doctor will begin with a physical exam. Tests may be administered to rule out the possibility of having a medical problem that actually contributes to the dysfunction.

An evaluation of a person’s attitude and outlook regarding sex will also help the doctor understand the root of the problem, and help him recommend solutions for it.

Treating female sexual dysfunction

The best approach to female dysfunction is a holistic approach, where work is not just done by the patient and doctor, but also by professionals like care providers and trained. Depending on the root cause, most types of sexual dysfunction can be corrected by paying attention to the underlying physiological and psychological problems and may be resolved by a trip to the doctor or the therapist.

Other than that, doctors may also recommend the following methods:

-Education, which involves educating about the human anatomy. This is especially helpful for women who are rather anxious about their sexual function.
-Enhancing stimulation through the use of erotic materials, and the encouragement for masturbation.
-Encouraging physically stimulating yet non-sexual activities increase communication between partners and make them more comfortable with each other.
-Minimizing pain through the use of sexual positions that are favorable to the woman, or the use of lubricants to reduce friction-induced pain.

Many women experience sexual problems from time to time, but most of them go away on their own. However, when the problems become persistent and start straining a relationship – a trip to the doctor may need to be scheduled to get the necessary intervention and treatment.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

October 4, 2010

Sex-Ed in Schools Fails to Address All Birth Control Options

The lessons taught during sexual education in school are a very important part of a teen’s development as a young adult.  However, a new government report has reported that only two thirds of all teens have been taught about birth control methods and options.  Many students are not engaging enough in learning about pregnancy prevention and safe sex.  Recent data shows that after many years of constant decline, the teen birth rate rose between 2005 and 2007, and decreased again in 2008 to 10 percent of all births.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention had female interviewers from the University of Michigan conducting interviews with nearly 2,800 teenagers between 2006 and 2008.  It was found that 97% of teens had received formal sex education by the age of 18.  This included instruction from school, church, community centers, or other settings.  The content of the instruction included how to say no to sex, information on sexually transmitted infections, and information on birth control.  Lessons concerning STIs were more common than lessons on how to use a condom or other types of birth control.  In total, two thirds of teens had reported being taugh about birth control by the end of high school – about 62% of boys and 70% of girls.  On the other hand, 92% of boys and girls had reported being taugh about STIs, and almost as many had learned about preventing being infected with AIDS.  In addition, 87% of females and 81% of males were taught how to say no to sex.

Other researchers have found that there has been a decline in comprehensive sexual education from 1995 – 2002.  This decline was largely due to government policies stressing an abstinence-only policy in educational systems. Most education programs talked about the threat of STIs, but not how to use various birth control methods.  On the contrary, in the last two years, more funding has been put into sex education programs that discuss birth control options.  An earlier CDC report released earlier this year found.

Another CDC study, released earlier this year, found that teenage use of birth control and teen attitudes toward pregnancy have remained about the same since 2002.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

December 9, 2009

Teens Are Not Getting “The Talk”

Filed under: sex ed,sex education,sex talk,Uncategorized — Candace @ 5:44 pm

Women looking at birth controlMost girls have had “The Talk” by the time they reach their mid-teens. “The Talk” that parents dread and avoid: the talk about sex. Unfortunately boys are less likely to get this talk than girls are.

There was a recent survey with surprising results concerning a lack of sexual education given to teens.

  • Only 25 percent of teen (ages 13 to 17) girls say they have yet to receive a talk about resisting pressure to have sex.
  • Almost two thirds of teen boys had never been talked about the importance of condoms before they had intercourse.
  • Over 50 percent of teens said they had masturbated before receiving a talk from their parents about sex.
  • Approximately 40 percent of girls had intercourse before talking about birth control with their parents.
  • Just under 50 percent of all high school students report they have had sexual intercourse.
  • Over 40 percent of teenagers in a recent survey had intercourse before receiving an in depth talk about STD’s and other important issues. Teens are not getting the information they should have to protect themselves.

Although it is difficult to talk to your teen about these issues, and even embarrassing, it is important for their future decisions to have this knowledge. You do not have to tell your child everything at once, but slowly give them information and advice as they grow and mature. Another issue with having

“The Talk” is that children are told, since they are young, not to ask about sex. Parents say things like
“You’re too young now, I’ll tell you when you’re older.” Kids learn soon not to ask these questions. Lastly, don’t be afraid to tell your teens that you are embarrassed. The children are also embarrassed and admitting it will help bond and have a better conversation.

One third of ninth graders have had intercourse. This is a disturbing fact, but talking to your kids and informing them, girls and boys alike, at a young age, is helpful and may prevent later mistakes.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.