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May 28, 2010

5 STI Risk Factors

At least one in every four Americans will contract and STI at some point in their life.   STI’s are a serious health problem to adults and if they go untreated, they can cause permanent  damage.  Certain factors in your life will determine your risk of contracting an STI, so here are the top 5 STI risk factors –

1. Unprotected Sex – This one is a given, but it is very important.  You’re more likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection if you do not use barrier methods of birth control like condoms.

2. Being Young – People between 18 and 29 are more likely to be infected with an STI than an older person.  Women and men in their 20’s have the highest rates of STI’s out of any age group.  This could be because young women are more susceptible to them.  Their cervix’s aren’t fully developed and they are more likely to experience tearing during intercourse.  Young people in general are less likley to practice safe sex by using condoms, and are more likely to have multiple partners.

3.Alcohol and drug use
–  People who use alcohol and drugs on regular basis may have lowered inhibitions and may be less “picky” about who they choose for a partner.  Those under the influence of alcohol and drugs may be more stubborn about condom use.

4. Having multiple partners – The more partners you have the more likely you are to be exposed to STI’s. Usually people with multiple partners choose partners who have also had multiple partners. This increases the risk of your partner having contracted an STI from a different partner.  Your risk increases even higher if you hire a sexual professional because the truth is they aren’t being paid to enforce safe sex with partners.

5. Relying only on Birth Control Pills – for most sexually active people their main concern is pregnancy.  Lots of couples choose birth control pills as their only contraceptive method.  This is 99% effective against pregnancy, but this does not protect against STI’s.  Once a couple is established in using the pill as their only form of protection, they will become reluctant to use condoms.  This can be because they have gotten used to a sexual routine without condoms, or perhaps because they just don’t like using them.  The safest option is to use birth control pills AND condoms.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

January 7, 2010

9 Important Birth Control Events of the Decade

In the last century we’ve witnessed extravagant improvements and findings to do with forms of contraception. However, in the last 10 years we’ve continued to experience many more changes to contraception as well. These changes include new forms of contraceptive, an abortion pill, changes in the prices and availability of a variety of birth control methods, and more.

1. In 2006 we were introduced to Seasonique, the extended cycle birth control pill. These pills were made available to women who want to reduce the number of times they had a bleeding period to four times a year. In 2007 Lybrel was approved and was designed to put a complete stop to periods all together. These pills improve the lifestyle of women who suffer from severe menstrual problems.

2. In 2002 a new form of sterilization for women was approved by the FDA. This procedure was designed for women who did not want to undergo surgery. Essure is a surgery-free contraceptive procedure. There are no incisions required – instead, small coil inserts are placed within the fallopian tubes. In 2009, the Essure surgery was publicized when Trista Sutter from the Bachelorette announced she was going to undergo the Essure procedure.

3. In 2007, the Family Planning services received an increase in their funding. This was to provide low income families with family planning services they would be able to afford. The group had been in need of an increase for many years. The 17 million dollar increase helped prevent about 20 million unintended pregnancies. 9 million of these prevented pregnancies would have otherwise been aborted.

4. President Obama was sworn into office on January 20th 2009. His promises for a woman’s right to choose her own reproductive freedoms helped him win the support of many Americans. Polls showed that 91% of Americans strongly favor the use of contraceptives. Obama declared that Roe.V Wade (support of abortion in the US)

“Not only protects womens health and reproductive freedom, but stands for a broader principle: that government should not intrude on our most private family matters.”

5. In 2000, the state-of-the-art IUD (Intrauterine Device) Mirena was approved. Because of the IUD’s reputation, the hassle-free Mirena IUD is still continuing to pick up in popularity. Mirena offers women a new combination hormone birth control option. One IUD can prevent pregnancy for up to 5 years and is 99.9% effective making it one of the most effective reversible contraceptive options out there.

6. In 2007, it was reported that teen pregnancy rates were on the rise for the first time in 14 years. In addition, it was also noted that the number of teens with STDs rose to 1 in 4 American teenage women. Read more about teen pregnancy and STD rates here.

7. The “morning after” emergency contraceptive pill took a lot of heat throughout the decade. Even today there is still controversy surrounding the pill. When the Plan B pill became available in the US in 1999, it was not available over the counter or to those over 18 years old. In 2003, the FDA voted for Plan B to be sold without a prescription but it wasn’t until 2006 when the FDA finally approved the sale of Plan B over the counter to those over 18. Plan B was not available to women under 18 until March 2009.

8. In 2001 the Nuvaring was approved. Nuvaring is a flexible ring that releases hormones to protect against pregnancy and inserted into the vagina. The Nuvaring gave women another reversible birth control option and is a perfect alternative to birth control pills.

9. American’s were extra cautious in 2009 when they saw the reality of the recession. Many partners used more contraceptives that in any other year in order to not get pregnant. To them, a baby seemed like another expense. This inflated the birth control sales by up to 10% for OTC products, 6% for condom sales, and a whopping 50-75% increase in the number of vasectomies performed on American men.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

February 2, 2009

What is an STI?

An STI is an acronym for Sexually Transmitted Infections. They are infections transmitted through having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has an infection. It can also be passed through skin-to-skin contact, childbirth, breastfeeding, sex toys, or through IV drug needles from an infected person. Both viruses and bacteria can develop an STI. Viruses that develop STI include HBV (Hepatitis B), HCV (Hepatitis C), herpes, genital warts, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and HPV (Human Popilloma Virus). Bacteria that develop STI include Chlamydia, gonorrhea, bacterial vaginosis, and syphilis.

What is the difference between an STI and an STD?

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD), also known as venereal diseases (VD), are infectious diseases passed from one person to another through sex. If left untreated, it can cause permanent damage, for example, infertility and death.

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) may infect others or a person may be infected without experiencing symptoms of the disease.

What are the symptoms of STI?

  • Itching around the vagina for women
  • Unusual discharge from the vagina for women
  • Discharge from the penis for men
  • Pain during or following sex
  • Pain or burning when urinating
  • Pain in the pelvic area
  • Sore throats in people who have oral sex
  • Pain in or around the anus for people who have anal sex
  • Chancre sores (painless red sores) on the genital area, anus, tongue and/or throat
  • A scaly rash on the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet
  • Dark urine, loose, light-colored stools, and yellow eyes and skin
  • Small blisters that turn into scabs on the genital area
  • Swollen glands, fever and body aches
  • Unusual infections, unexplained fatigue, night sweats and weight loss
  • Soft, flesh-colored warts around the genital area
  • Flu-like symptoms (eg. HBV, HCV, HIV)

How can I prevent myself from getting an STI?

To lower the risk of getting an STI is to have sex with someone who is not having sex with anyone else and who does not have an STI. Always use condoms when having sex, including oral and anal sex. Limit the number of sex partners you have and ask him/her if he/she has had or been tested for an STI. Also let him/her know if you have had or tested for one too. Do not have sex if either you or your partner is being treated for an STI.

Although STIs do not always have symptoms, look for signs of STI in your sex partner. The best way to kill the germs before they infect you, wash your genitals with soap and water and urinate soon after you have sex.

Do not use spermicide to prevent STIs. Recent study results indicate that the nonoxynol-9 in spermicides irritates a womans vagina and cervix increasing the risk for an STI infection. Make sure you check other products for ingredients with nonoxynol-9 before using it.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control (prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line.

For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.
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Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.