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August 23, 2010

Microbicide Gel Reduces Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women

HIV prevention, AIDs prevention, HIV infectionMicrobicides are intended to serve as a preventative option for sexually transmitted infections for women who are unable to reason their partners to the use of condoms or mutual monogamy. Researchers are working with manufacturers to develop microbicides in the form of suppositories, gels, films, creams or as sponges or rings that release active preventative ingredients over time in the same way as certain birth control products, which allows for a preventative option that can be controlled by a woman, independent of her partner. Though this product is still in the developing stages and not yet ready for public use, the idea of a microbicide has tremendous potential, as researchers forecast that microbicides are to be the greatest innovation in reproductive health since the Pill.

The results of a recent study conducted by the Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) have made a breakthrough for AIDs and HIV research, in a vaginal microbicide that was shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection by thirty-nine percent. This vaginal microbicide was distributed in the form of a gel containing tenofovir to several South African women, while several other South African received a placebo gel. The study was conducted from a minimum of one year to a maximum of two years, and concluded that the use of this gel not only reduced HIV infections during sex by thirty nine percent, it additionally reduced the occurrence of herpes infections by fifty-one percent.

These positive study results mark a new era in HIV and AIDs prevention, especially for women in difficult circumstances who do not have the social or economic power to invest in other preventative options. As researchers continue to explore the options surrounding microbicides, including a microbicide that prevents pregnancy as well as protecting against HIV infection, North American consumers can expect to see microbicides on the market any time from five to seven years from now.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

June 2, 2010

Ultrasound is a Male Contraceptive

Researchers in the University of North Carolina are pushing for further research into the new idea that an ultrasound can be used as a reversible contraceptive for men. The idea is that a blast of ultrasound to the testes may be able to stop sperm production for approximately six months. Once the sperm production has been stopped, all the sperm in the sperm reserves must be used up before this contraceptive method is effective.

This would offer another method of birth control for couples. It is thought that these sperm impeding ultrasounds would be affordable to most people. The plan in the long-term for the University team is to use an ultrasound from instruments found in sports medicine or physical therapy clinics. One of the best things about this contraceptive method is that it is thought that the sperm production will continue as normal after the approximate six months of infertility is up.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation sponsored this research with a $100,000 grant (one of seventy-eight grants by this foundation). This financial help will support the pursuing of clinical trials to prove this method. One warning issued about this contraceptive is that although it will prevent pregnancy (if it is proven), it will not protect against the transmissions of STI’s.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

May 28, 2010

5 STI Risk Factors

At least one in every four Americans will contract and STI at some point in their life.   STI’s are a serious health problem to adults and if they go untreated, they can cause permanent  damage.  Certain factors in your life will determine your risk of contracting an STI, so here are the top 5 STI risk factors –

1. Unprotected Sex – This one is a given, but it is very important.  You’re more likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection if you do not use barrier methods of birth control like condoms.

2. Being Young – People between 18 and 29 are more likely to be infected with an STI than an older person.  Women and men in their 20’s have the highest rates of STI’s out of any age group.  This could be because young women are more susceptible to them.  Their cervix’s aren’t fully developed and they are more likely to experience tearing during intercourse.  Young people in general are less likley to practice safe sex by using condoms, and are more likely to have multiple partners.

3.Alcohol and drug use
–  People who use alcohol and drugs on regular basis may have lowered inhibitions and may be less “picky” about who they choose for a partner.  Those under the influence of alcohol and drugs may be more stubborn about condom use.

4. Having multiple partners – The more partners you have the more likely you are to be exposed to STI’s. Usually people with multiple partners choose partners who have also had multiple partners. This increases the risk of your partner having contracted an STI from a different partner.  Your risk increases even higher if you hire a sexual professional because the truth is they aren’t being paid to enforce safe sex with partners.

5. Relying only on Birth Control Pills – for most sexually active people their main concern is pregnancy.  Lots of couples choose birth control pills as their only contraceptive method.  This is 99% effective against pregnancy, but this does not protect against STI’s.  Once a couple is established in using the pill as their only form of protection, they will become reluctant to use condoms.  This can be because they have gotten used to a sexual routine without condoms, or perhaps because they just don’t like using them.  The safest option is to use birth control pills AND condoms.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.

February 2, 2009

What is an STI?

An STI is an acronym for Sexually Transmitted Infections. They are infections transmitted through having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has an infection. It can also be passed through skin-to-skin contact, childbirth, breastfeeding, sex toys, or through IV drug needles from an infected person. Both viruses and bacteria can develop an STI. Viruses that develop STI include HBV (Hepatitis B), HCV (Hepatitis C), herpes, genital warts, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and HPV (Human Popilloma Virus). Bacteria that develop STI include Chlamydia, gonorrhea, bacterial vaginosis, and syphilis.

What is the difference between an STI and an STD?

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD), also known as venereal diseases (VD), are infectious diseases passed from one person to another through sex. If left untreated, it can cause permanent damage, for example, infertility and death.

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) may infect others or a person may be infected without experiencing symptoms of the disease.

What are the symptoms of STI?

  • Itching around the vagina for women
  • Unusual discharge from the vagina for women
  • Discharge from the penis for men
  • Pain during or following sex
  • Pain or burning when urinating
  • Pain in the pelvic area
  • Sore throats in people who have oral sex
  • Pain in or around the anus for people who have anal sex
  • Chancre sores (painless red sores) on the genital area, anus, tongue and/or throat
  • A scaly rash on the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet
  • Dark urine, loose, light-colored stools, and yellow eyes and skin
  • Small blisters that turn into scabs on the genital area
  • Swollen glands, fever and body aches
  • Unusual infections, unexplained fatigue, night sweats and weight loss
  • Soft, flesh-colored warts around the genital area
  • Flu-like symptoms (eg. HBV, HCV, HIV)

How can I prevent myself from getting an STI?

To lower the risk of getting an STI is to have sex with someone who is not having sex with anyone else and who does not have an STI. Always use condoms when having sex, including oral and anal sex. Limit the number of sex partners you have and ask him/her if he/she has had or been tested for an STI. Also let him/her know if you have had or tested for one too. Do not have sex if either you or your partner is being treated for an STI.

Although STIs do not always have symptoms, look for signs of STI in your sex partner. The best way to kill the germs before they infect you, wash your genitals with soap and water and urinate soon after you have sex.

Do not use spermicide to prevent STIs. Recent study results indicate that the nonoxynol-9 in spermicides irritates a womans vagina and cervix increasing the risk for an STI infection. Make sure you check other products for ingredients with nonoxynol-9 before using it.

Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control (prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line.

For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.
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Birth Control Buzz is a service company that provides birth control prices, types of birth control(prescription required), health administrative services, and birth control statistics predominantly to US patients seeking to purchase pharmaceuticals on-line. For more information, call 1-866-868-8850 or visit http://www.birthcontrolbuzz.com/.